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Different Types of Columns Used in Construction

What is a Column?
Columns are rigid vertical structural components meant to support axial compressive loads from beams and slabs and then transfer them to the ground via footings. The various loads created in a structure are carried by column to footings and footings to the soil. As a result, the column is critical to the overall load transfer mechanism, and the structure would be incomplete without it.

However, not every vertical member must be a column. A column is defined as a member with a length greater than three times its smallest cross-sectional size. If this criterion is not met, the vertical part is referred to as a strut.
The strength of a column is determined by the material employed, its geometry, form, cross-section size, and its length and position about the support condition at both ends.

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Different Types of Bricks Used in Construction

Bricks are rectangular units of uniform dimensions. Clay is used to making bricks. In construction, there are different types of brick. When stone is not accessible, bricks are commonly utilized as a substitute. Brick is a common building material made of clay and comes in rectangular shapes. Because of their inexpensive cost and long lifespan, they have remained popular since ancient times.

Advantages of Bricks Used in Construction:

  • Brick is fire-resistant and can sustain high temperatures.
  • Brick is a long-lasting and sturdy material.
  • .Individual brick problems can be solved without tearing down and rebuilding the entire structure.
  • For environmental protection, brick does not require the use of paints
  • Clay that is readily available aids in the production of bricks in the local area, reducing shipping expenses. It could suggest that brick construction is less expensive than stone, concrete, or steel construction.

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Grillage Foundation – Design, Installation & Types

What Grillage Foundation?
Grillage foundations are made of one, two, or more levels of beams (usual steel) superimposed on a layer of concrete to distribute load across a large area. It is found at the bottom of the columns. These layers are concrete-encased and at right angles to one another. This foundation form commonly supports heavy building columns, piers, and scaffolds.

Even though foundation and grillage appear to be the same, they are not. Grillage disperses huge loads across broad areas, similar to how foundations distribute the load from the structure to the ground.

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Vaulted Ceilings – Types, Advantages and Disadvantages

What is Vaulted Ceiling?
A vaulted ceiling slopes up toward the roof and extends higher than average flat ceilings’ typical eight to ten-foot height. Arched, barrel, cathedral, domed, groin, and rib are some of the most popular vaulted ceilings, each with its structure. Originally used to designate ceilings with a self-supporting arch in classical architectural design, the word “vaulted ceiling” is now commonly used to describe any sloped, high ceiling.

During the middle ages, vaulted ceilings were a significant element of Gothic and Roman churches and basilicas (public buildings). Still, over time, they progressively became the ceilings of some traditional, modern, and industrial-style dwellings. A vaulted ceiling differs from other types of ceilings in that it extends from the building’s side walls to the central point, creating a great volume of overhead space.

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Types of Bridge Abutment

What is Bridge Abutment?
The bridge abutment is crucial at the bridge’s end, supporting the bridge’s superstructure. It also links to the ground-level road and supports the bridge via the abutment. The infill material supports the bridge path.

The location of the site and the function of the need determine which abutment is utilized in the bridge. Abutment comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. The use of an abutment is determined by the cost and type of the abutment concerning the site location.
Fig 1 Bridge Abutment
Fig 1: Bridge Abutment
Courtesy: terre-armee.com

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