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What is Concrete Pump – Types, Uses, Advantage and Disadvantages

What is a Concrete Pump?
A concrete pump is a machine to transport liquid concrete from storage tanks or batching plants to the worksite where it will be poured or filled. A concrete pump is a crucial piece of equipment for any construction job of significant scale. A concrete pump, which is now standard fare on every building site, is the most popular tool for transporting or transferring liquid concrete. The concrete pump has greatly accelerated construction times, particularly for tall buildings like skyscrapers.

Pouring concrete in tight or crowded spaces is made easier with the help of concrete pumps. Therefore, whether you’re placing the concrete in a footing slab or on the top floor of a skyscraper, concrete pumps can get the mixture there without leaving streaks or bubbles on the ground.

In high-rise buildings or behind protected concrete barriers, where accuracy in pouring is paramount, concrete pumps are an indispensable tool. When using a concrete pump, there is significantly less waste and greater precision in the finished product.
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Underpinning Method of Foundation

What is Underpinning?
Underpinning is a method used to repair and strengthen the foundation of a building. During underpinning, reinforcements are positioned throughout the length or breadth of an already established base. Because of this, its weight is distributed across a larger area and rests on solid earth layers. Micro-piling and jet grouting are common underlying methods, despite being time-consuming and costly.

Underpinning is excavating the soil that’s pulling away from the structure and eliminating the foundation holding it up. There will be movement in the building when the current foundations become weakened. The property’s foundations and structure are strengthened by installing new, more robust materials and digging deeper footings on top of the more stable growth.
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What is Concrete Discoloration- Causes, Preventions and Treatments?

What is Concrete Discoloration?
A simple definition of concrete discoloration is a shift away from the original color. The presence of calcium chloride in the concrete, cement, and additives, as well as problems with curing, weather, and poor workmanship, could all play a role. These causes of discoloration can be mitigated to some extent. However, steps can be taken to mitigate the effects of dark patches, strips, and blotchy concrete that a contractor may experience. Once the concrete has fully cured, the appropriate treatment method can be chosen based on the root of the discoloration.

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What is Concrete Anchor – Functions, Installation and Types

What is Concrete Anchor?
An anchor is a piece of steel used to transfer loads to concrete. They can be cast into the concrete or put into a piece of hardened concrete later. There are several kinds of cast-in anchors, but headed bolts, hooked bolts (J- or L-bolts), and headed studs are the most common. The expansion anchor, the undercut anchor, and the sticky anchor are the three anchors used after the fact.

In adhesive anchors, steel parts like threaded rods and reinforcing bars that have been bent or internally threaded steel sleeves with bends on the outside are used. Anchor systems often join two structural parts or attach a non-structural part to a building.
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What is Concrete Retarder – Types, Uses, Advantages and Disadvantages

What is Concrete Retarder?

Retarders are additives that slow the setting of cement paste and, by extension, mixtures like mortar or concrete that contains cement. Concrete retarders are also known as retarding admixtures or just retarders. Adding a retarder to the concrete mix can delay the setting time by up to an hour. They slow the hardening process in warmer weather to give workers more time to mix, transport and place the concrete. Retarders not only slow down the process, but they also save water.
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