Concrete Mix Design with Fly Ash and Superplasticizer

By
KAUSHAL KISHORE
Materials Engineer, Roorkee

Fly ash or pulverished fuel ash (pfa) is a finely divided powder thrown out as a waste material at the thermal power plants using pulverized coal for raising steam in the boilers. In the building industry, the use of fly ash a part replacement of cement in mortar and concrete at the construction site has been made all over the world including India and is well known. The important building materials which can be produced from fly ash are:

Continue Reading »

M-80 Grade Pumpable Concrete

By
Kaushal Kishore
Materials Engineer, Roorkee

A mix of M-80 Grade suitable for pumped concrete is to be designed with the following materials and detail.

1. OPC 53 Grade, 7-day strength 52.5 N/mm2, Spgr 3.15

2. Silica Fume Specific Gravity 2.20

3. Standard deviation for the mix 5.0 N/mm2

4. Grading and properties of river sand and 12.5 mm crushed aggregate are given in Table-1

5. Superplasticizer based on modified Polycarboxylate, specific gravity 1.06, liquid pH 6.0. With the given set of materials, it was found that at a dosages of 2.5 % bwc it gives a reduction of 30% of water for the required slump of 100 mm after one hour at the average day site temperature of 37 degree C.
Continue Reading »

Mix Design For Concrete Roads As Per IRC:15-2011

By
Kaushal Kishore, Materials Engineer, Roorkee

ABSTRACT:
The stresses induced in concrete pavements are mainly flexural. Therefore flexural strength is more often specified than compressive strength in the design of concrete mixes for pavement construction. A simple method of concrete mix design based on flexural strength for normal weight concrete mixes is described in the paper.

INTRODUCTION:
Usual criterion for the strength of concrete in the building industry is the compressive strength, which is considered as a measure of quality concrete. However, in pavement constructions, such as highway and airport runway, the flexural strength of concrete is considered more important, as the stresses induced in concrete pavements are mainly flexural. Therefore, flexural strength is more often specified than compressive strength in the design of concrete mixes for pavement construction. It is not perfectly reliable to predict flexural strength from compressive strength. Further, various codes of the world specified that the paving concrete mixes should preferably be designed in the laboratory and controlled in the field on the basis of its flexural strength. Therefore, there is a need to design concrete mixes based on flexural strength.
Continue Reading »

Understanding Nominal and Design Mixes

By
Kaushal Kishore
Materials Engineer, Roorkee

Cement concrete in India on large scale is being used since the last about 70 years. In the early days the following nominal ratio by volume for concrete were specified.

Cement

:

Sand

:

Aggregate

1

:

2

:

4

Correspond to M-15 Grade

1

:

1.5

:

3

Correspond to M-20 Grade

1

:

1

:

2

Correspond to M-25 Grade

IS : 456-2000 has recommended that minimum grade of concrete shall be not less than M-20 in reinforced concrete work. Design mix concrete is preferred to nominal mix. If design mix concrete cannot be used for any reason on the work for grades of M-20 or lower, nominal mixes may be used with the permission of engineer-in-charge, which however is likely to involve a higher cement content.
Continue Reading »

Filed under Mix Design | 19 Comments

What is Marshall Mix Design for Bituminous Materials?

The Marshall Mix Design method was originally developed by Bruce Marshall of the Mississippi Highway Department in 1939. The main idea of the Marshall Mix Design method involves the selection of the asphalt binder content with a suitable density which satisfies minimum stability and range of flow values.

The Marshall Mix Design method consists mainly of the following steps:

(i) Determination of physical properties, size and gradation of aggregates.

(ii) Selection of types of asphalt binder.

(iii) Prepare initial samples, each with different asphalt binder content.
For example, three samples are made each at 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 and 6.5 percent asphalt by dry weight for a total of 15 samples. There should be at least two samples above and two below the estimated optimum asphalt content.

(iv) Plot the following graphs:

(a) Asphalt binder content vs. density
(b) Asphalt binder content vs. Marshall stability
(c) Asphalt binder content vs. flow
(d) Asphalt binder content vs. air voids
(e) Asphalt binder content vs. voids in mineral aggregates
(f) Asphalt binder content vs voids filled with asphalt

(v) Determine the asphalt binder content which corresponds to the air void content of 4 percent

(vi) Determine properties at this optimum asphalt binder content by reference with the graphs. Compare each of these values against design requirements and if all comply with design requirements, then the selected optimum asphalt binder content is acceptable. Otherwise, the mixture should be redesigned.

marshall-mix-design

This question is taken from book named – A Self Learning Manual – Mastering Different Fields of Civil Engineering Works (VC-Q-A-Method) by Vincent T. H. CHU.

Page 1 of 512345

Share Information

What is Civil Engineering

Journals Books And Softwares

Branches Of Civil Engineering

Civil Engineering Jobs

Follow Us On FB

Knowledge Center

Civil Engineering Universities/Events

Gallery - Civil Engineering Pictures

Search


engineeringcivil.com awarded best online publication by CIDC 2013

Top Contributors

Yahoo Group - Civil Engineering Portal

Subscribe to EngineeringCivil.com


Powered by groups.yahoo.com

Recently Added

Civil Engineering Links

Follow Us On FB