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Mix design M25 Grade designed as per IS 10262:2009 & IS 456:2000

(FOR BANGAlORE REGION)
DESIGNED By: G.PRABHAKARAN M.TECh, QA/QC ENGINEER

Mix proportioning for a concrete of M25 grade is given in A·I to A-ll.
A·I STIPULATIONS FOR PROPORTIONING

a) Grade designation : M25
b) Type of cement : OPC 53 Grade conforming IS 12269
c) Maximum nominal size of aggregate : 20mm
d) Minimum cement content : 300 kg/m3 (IS 456:2000)
e) Maximum water-cement ratio : 0.50 (Table 5 of IS 456:2000)
f) Workability : 100-120mm slump
g) Exposure condition : Moderate (For Reinforced Concrete)
h) Method of concrete placing : Pumping
j) Degree of supervision : Good
k) Type of aggregate : Crushed Angular Aggregates
m) Maximum cement content : 340 kg/m3
n) Chemical admixture type : Super Plasticizer ECMAS HP 890

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Mix design M30 Grade designed as per IS 10262:2009 & IS 456:2000

(FOR BANGAlORE REGION)
DESIGNED By: G.PRABHAKARAN M.TECh, QA/QC ENGINEER

Mix proportioning for a concrete of M30 grade is given in A·I to A-ll.
A·I STIPULATIONS FOR PROPORTIONING

a) Grade designation : M30
b) Type of cement : OPC 53 Grade conforming IS 12269
c) Maximum nominal size of aggregate : 20mm
d) Minimum cement content : 320 kg/m3 (IS 456:2000)
e) Maximum water-cement ratio : 0.45 (Table 5 of IS 456:2000)
f) Workability : 100-120mm slump
g) Exposure condition : Moderate (For Reinforced Concrete)
h) Method of concrete placing : Pumping
j) Degree of supervision : Good
k) Type of aggregate : Crushed Angular Aggregates
m) Maximum cement content : 360 kg/m3
n) Chemical admixture type : Super Plasticizer ECMAS HP 890

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Mix design M35 Grade designed as per IS 10262:2009 & IS 456:2000

(FOR BANGAlORE REGION)
DESIGNED By: G.PRABHAKARAN M.TECh, QA/QC ENGINEER

Mix proportioning for a concrete of M35 grade is given in A·I to A-ll.
A·I STIPULATIONS FOR PROPORTIONING

a) Grade designation : M35
b) Type of cement : OPC 53 Grade conforming IS 12269
c) Maximum nominal size of aggregate : 20mm
d) Minimum cement content : 340 kg/m3 (IS 456:2000)
e) Maximum water-cement ratio : 0.45 (Table 5 of IS 456:2000)
f) Workability : 100-120mm slump
g) Exposure condition : Moderate (For Reinforced Concrete)
h) Method of concrete placing : Pumping
j) Degree of supervision : Good
k) Type of aggregate : Crushed Angular Aggregates
m) Maximum cement content : 390 kg/m3
n) Chemical admixture type : Super Plasticizer ECMAS HP 890

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Mix design M40 Grade designed as per IS 10262:2009 & IS 456:2000

(FOR BANGAlORE REGION)
DESIGNED By: G.PRABHAKARAN M.TECh, QA/QC ENGINEER

Mix proportioning for a concrete of M40 grade is given in A·I to A-ll.
A·I STIPULATIONS FOR PROPORTIONING

a) Grade designation : M40
b) Type of cement : OPC 53 Grade conforming IS 12269
c) Maximum nominal size of aggregate : 20mm
d) Minimum cement content : 360 kg/m3 (IS 456:2000)
e) Maximum water-cement ratio : 0.40 (Table 5 of IS 456:2000)
f) Workability : 100-120mm slump
g) Exposure condition : Moderate (For Reinforced Concrete)
h) Method of concrete placing : Pumping
j) Degree of supervision : Good
k) Type of aggregate : Crushed Angular Aggregates
m) Maximum cement content : 420 kg/m3
n) Chemical admixture type : Super Plasticizer ECMAS HP 890

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Self Healing Concrete

By
Shubham Sunil Malu

ABSTRACT
Self-healing materials are a class of smart materials that have the structurally incorporated ability to repair damage caused by mechanical usage over time. The inspiration comes from biological systems, which have the ability to heal after being wounded. Initiation of cracks and other types of damage on a microscopic level has been shown to change thermal, electrical, and acoustical properties, and eventually lead to whole scale failure of the material. Usually, cracks are mended by hand, which is unsatisfactory because cracks are often hard to detect. A material (polymers, ceramics, etc.) that can intrinsically correct damage caused by normal usage could lower production costs of a number of different industrial processes through longer part lifetime, reduction of inefficiency over time caused by degradation, as well as prevent costs incurred by material failure. For a material to be defined strictly as self-healing, it is necessary that the healing process occurs without human intervention. Some examples shown below, however, include healing polymers that require intervention to initiate the healing process.

A good way to enable multiple healing events is to use living (or unterminated chain-ends) polymerization catalysts. If the walls of the capsule are created too thick, they may not fracture when the crack approaches, but if they are too thin, they may rupture prematurely.

In order for this process to happen at room temperature, and for the reactants to remain in a monomeric state within the capsule, a catalyst is also imbedded into the thermoset. The catalyst lowers the energy barrier of the reaction and allows the monomer to polymerize without the addition of heat. The capsules (often made of wax) around the monomer and the catalyst are important maintain separation until the crack facilitates the reaction.

There are many challenges in designing this type of material. First, the reactivity of the catalyst must be maintained even after it is enclosed in wax. Additionally, the monomer must flow at a sufficient rate (have low enough viscosity) to cover the entire crack before it is polymerized, or full healing capacity will not be reached. Finally, the catalyst must quickly dissolve into monomer in order to react efficiently and prevent the crack from spreading further.

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