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In wind tunnel test, why are similarity of Reynolds Number between real bridge and model is often neglected?

Wind tunnel test is often conducted to check aerodynamic stability of long-span bridges. To properly conduct wind tunnel test, aerodynamic similarity conditions should be made equal between the proposed bridge and the model. Reynolds Number is one of these conditions and is defined as ratio of inertial force to viscous force of wind fluid. With equality of Froude Number, it is difficult to achieve equality in Reynolds Number.

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How does deck equipment (median dividers and parapets) affect the aerodynamic response of long-span bridges?

Bridge parapets raise the overall level of bluffness of long-span bridges. When the solidity ratio of barriers increases, the effect of increasing the bluffness also becomes more significant. The principal effects of deck equipment such as median dividers and parapets is that it enhances an increase in drag forces and a reduction in average value of lift force.

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How does flatter affect the stability of long bridges?

Flutter is a potentially destructive vibration and it is self-feeding in nature. The aerodynamic forces on a bridge, which is in nearly same natural mode of vibration of the bridge, cause periodic motion.

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How do vortex-induced vibrations affect the stability of long bridges?

When wind flows around a bridge, it would be slowed down when in contact with its surface and forms boundary layer. At some location, this boundary layer tends to separate from the bridge body owing to excessive curvature. This results in the formation of vortex which revises the pressure distribution over the bridge surface. The vortex formed may not be symmetric about the bridge body and different lifting forces are formed around the body.

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How does the shape of bridge deck affect the aerodynamic behaviour?

Two types of bridge vibration that are of special concern are:

(i) Flutter, which is self-induced vibration characterized by occurrence of vertical and torsional motion at high wind speeds.

(ii) Vortex shedding, which is the vibration induced by turbulence alternating above and below the bridge deck at low wind speeds.

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