Search

Construction Terms Beginning With Letter: K

Keeper– The metal latch plate in a door frame into which a doorknob plunger latches.

Keyless– A plastic or porcelain light fixture that operates by a pull string. Generally found in the basement, crawl space , and attic areas.

Keyway– A slot formed and poured on a footer or in a foundation wall when another wall will be installed at the slot location. This gives additional strength to the joint/meeting point.

Continue Reading »

Construction Terms Beginning With Letter: J

J Channel– Metal edging used on drywall to give the edge a better finished appearance when a wall is not “wrapped” Generally, basement stairway walls have drywall only on the stair side. J Channel is used on the vertical edge of the last drywall sheet

Jack post– A type of structural support made of metal, which can be raised or lowered through a series of pins and a screw to meet the height required. Basically used as a replacement for an old supporting member in a building. See Monopost.

Jack rafter– A rafter that spans the distance from the wall plate to a hip, or from a valley to a ridge.

Jamb– The side and head lining of a doorway, window, or other opening. Includes studs as well as the frame and trim.

Continue Reading »

Construction Terms Beginning With Letter: I

I-beam– A steel beam with a cross section resembling the letter I. It is used for long spans as basement beams or over wide wall openings, such as a double garage door, when wall and roof loads bear down on the opening.

I-joist– Manufactured structural building component resembling the letter “I”. Used as floor joists and rafters. I-joists include two key parts: flanges and webs. The flange of the I joist may be made of laminated veneer lumber or dimensional lumber, usually formed into a 1 ½” width. The web or center of the I-joist is commonly made of plywood or oriented strand board (OSB). Large holes can be cut in the web to accommodate duct work and plumbing waste lines. I-joists are available in lengths up to 60 feet long

Incandescent lamp– A lamp employing an electrically charged metal filament that glows at white heat. A typical light bulb.

Continue Reading »

Construction Terms Beginning With Letter: H

H Clip– Small metal clips formed like an “H” that fits at the joints of two plywood (or wafer board) sheets to stiffen the joint. Normally used on the roof sheeting.

Hardware– All of the “metal” fittings that go into the home when it is near completion. For example, door knobs, towel bars, handrail brackets, closet rods, house numbers, door closers, etc. The Interior Trim Carpenter installs the “hardware”.

Haunch– An extension, knee like protrusion of the foundation wall that a concrete porch or patio will rest upon for support.

Hazard insurance – Protection against damage caused by fire, windstorms, or other common hazards. Many lenders require borrowers to carry it in an amount at least equal to the mortgage.

Continue Reading »

Construction Terms Beginning With Letter: G

GF C I, or G F I– Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter- an ultra sensitive plug designed to shut off all electric current. Used in bathrooms, kitchens, exterior waterproof outlets, garage outlets, and “wet areas”. Has a small reset button on the plug.

Gable– The end, upper, triangular area of a home, beneath the roof.

Gang nail plate– A steel plate attached to both sides at each joint of a truss. Sometimes called a fishplate or gussett.

Gate valve– A valve that lets you completely stop—but not modulate—the flow within a pipe.

General Contractor A contractor who enters into a contract with the owner of a project for the construction of the project and who takes full responsibility for its completion, although the contractor may enter into subcontracts with others for the performance of specific parts or phases of the project.

Gas lateral– The trench or area in the yard where the gas line service is located, or the work of installing the gas service to a home.

Girder– A large or principal beam of wood or steel used to support concentrated loads at isolated points along its length.

Continue Reading »