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Myths on Beam construction – Challenge to overcome

By
Sourav Dutta
Manager-Civil

There are a number of ways in which the superstructure can be built. In areas where average to good quality bricks are available, the walls of houses for two to three storeyed constructions can be built out of bricks with the slabs, lintels, chajja etc. in reinforced concrete. Such construction is supported entirely on load bearing brick walls (Fig 1), foundation of which ultimately transfers the building load to underneath soil.


Fig 1: Load Bearing Construction on brick

Fig 2 RCC framed construction
Fig 2: RCC framed construction

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Salient features of Foundation Construction

By
Sourav Dutta
Manager-Civil

What is Foundation?

Any structure can be divided into 2 parts:
1. Superstructure: Part of structure above Ground level (GL)
2. Substructure/ Foundation: Part of structure below GL

Components of foundation:
Typically there are 3 components of foundation: (i) Footing, (ii) Column, (iii) Tie beam (refer to picture below)

components-of-foundation

What is a footing?
Footing is that part of substructure that ultimately transfers the load (dead/live/wind/seismic) to the supporting soil in such a way that the safe load bearing capacity of soil is not exceeded (refer to table 1 for estimation of the safe load bearing capacity of the soil). Footing is a structure constructed in brick work masonry or RCC (refer to figure 1) under the base of a wall or RCC column for distributing the load over a large area.

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Proper Slab Construction Concepts – A Challenge to overcome

By
Sourav Dutta
Manager-Civil

What is slab?
A RCC (Reinforced Cement Concrete) slab is the most common structural element of any type of building. Horizontal slabs, typically between 4 and 20 inches (100 and 500 millimeters) thick, are most often used to construct floors and ceilings.Here discussion on “flat slab” has not been considered.

proper-slab-construction-concepts

proper-slab-construction-concepts2

Typical loads to be considered for slab design
(i) Dead load: Any permanent load acting on the slab e.g. self-weight of slab, weight of floor finish & plaster

(ii) Live Load: Any non-permanent or moving load e.g. weight of occupants, furniture, and partitionon the slab

(iii) Snow load (if any)

Note: Earthquake and Wind loads are not considered in the design of slabs.

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Wrong Myths On Column Construction – A Challenge To Overcome

By
Sourav Dutta
Manager-Civil

Introduction
There are a number of ways in which the superstructure can be built. In areas where average to good quality bricks are available, the walls of houses for two to three storeyed constructions can be built out of bricks with the slabs, lintels, chajja etc. in reinforced concrete. Such construction is termed as load bearing construction (Fig 1). This is essentially because the entire load coming from the slabs, beams, walls etc is transmitted to the foundation through the brick walls.

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How to Assess the Quality of Fine Aggregate at Site?

1. Introduction
There are lots of methods and test, that we can use for assessing the quality of construction sand or Common sand. But when it comes to the case of site practices, the methods like bulk density, bulkage, specific gravity test etc, become difficult or up to an extent impossible. There comes the importance of Sieve test on fine aggregates.

Sieve testing is one of the very fast methods of checking the quality of construction sand. Even though, the result of sieve test cannot be considered as the final result to ensure the quality of sand.

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